On a windswept island

Lockwood homes are known for their strength and resilience, and a holiday home on remote D’Urville Island is proof the building system can be trusted.

The island, at the top of the Marlborough Sounds, is exposed to the weather extremes that give Cook Strait is fearsome reputation. But it’s also a beautiful place that captivated homeowners Rupert and Ann Wilson.

Seventeen years ago a local commercial fisherman warned them against building their house on the ridgeline, which provided the best view of a lake and the sea. The fisherman said no house would be able to cope with the gale-force winds.

“He was right about the severity of the wind, but not about the house,” says Rupert. “We chose to build a Lockwood because of the strength of the building system, and the house has survived without any damage whatsoever.”

Rupert says one of the worst storms upended a tandem caravan on the site and completely flattened it. “The caravan was then bounced 30m up the hill on its roof. But the house was untouched.”

While the intrinsic strength of the Lockwood building system was the first reason the owners chose a Lockwood, there were other considerations. “We really liked the wood finish and the low maintenance, which has been a huge bonus over the years.”

The home is equipped with a solar power system, and water comes from a stream on the property.

Rupert says the family usually charters a small plane to travel to the island from Wellington, which takes 25 minutes, as opposed to a journey of 8 hours via ferry and a local transport. Key holiday activities include fishing, surfing, boating and hunting. “It’s dramatically beautiful, remote, and an absolute paradise – and most of the time the weather is really great.”

See how the Lockwood building system creates an extra-strong home.